Unlucky 13?

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So we had the call from the embryologist. We had 18 eggs but only 13 have fertilised and made it to the next stage. I’m a little disappointed but let’s see what happens over the next few days…

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Egg Collection

a follicle.jpgToday was my egg collection and suddenly the whole thing felt very real. To my surprise the nurse, anesthetist and embryologist remembered us and greeted us warmly. The procedure was a fairly unremarkable experience since I was under general anesthetic. One minute I was having a chat with the doctor, the next I woke up in the recovery room and it was all done!

The egg collection was a success and they retrieved 18 eggs. Now we must wait to hear how many fertilised. It is hard not to compare everything to last time. But since our eggs and sperm are 2 years older I don’t suppose the outcome is comparable. However last time I had 16 eggs so already we are in a better position. However it’s all to play for now as there are a multitude of variables which will dictate the outcome.

Tomorrow, and for the next 5 days, I will receive a phone call with updates on the progress of the embryos. All being well we will have a few that make it to blastocyst stage, one of which we can transfer in 5 days time. The waiting begins.

Ice Ice Baby

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According to yesterday’s Evening Standard egg-freezing parties are all the rage! Just like the Tupperware party, this party features wine, canapés and a discount on anything you buy. But what you’re shelling out for, is oocyte cryopreservation — AKA a batch of frozen eggs.

In the US these soirées were designed for women seeking advice on fertility and delaying motherhood. London’s fertility experts say egg-freezing parties could be on the horizon too. This option, originally available for cancer patients, could become more widely practised.

Either way couples are reminded to consider how their career choices will impact on their fertility and realise egg-freezing does not guarantee a baby. By 30, women have already lost around 90 per cent of their eggs, and women who grew up in a household of smokers can go through the menopause up to eight years earlier than those who did not. Only 20 babies had been born in the UK after treatment using patients’ own frozen eggs by the start of 2013, according to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, the UK’s independent regulator of the use of embryos, although around 18,000 eggs have been stored in the UK for patients’ own use. The odds aren’t good. But choice is, and I hope women who attend allow egg-freezing parties will receive valuable information which helps them to understand their fertility better.